Supporting Cure Research for More than T1D

I’ve talked about why I personally participate in medical research before. As a person with type 1 diabetes, I feel that I have the obligation to do what I can do to move toward a world without T1D as well as help those who are more scientifically inclined than I am to improve quality of life and treatment options for this disease.

I support research, beyond what I’m doing personally. Which is why I got involved with CureClick, which helps studies recruit participants.

You’ll notice a new box on the sidebar of my blog (at the bottom if you’re viewing on a mobile device). You can find studies related to your medical situation and see if you qualify to participate. Most of these studies provide so
me form of compensation.

Periodically, I’ll promote different studies on my social media channels as well as here to help them find the people that they need. Here are just a few studies that are currently recruiting:

Type 2 Diabetes Management Study is seeking people who live with type 2 diabetes, ages 18-75 to participate in an online only study. Find out more here: http://curec.lk/2bRD16p

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) clinical trial is currently recruiting participants to test the effectiveness of the chemotherapy drug chlorambucil. Learn more here: http://curec.lk/2cgX8Ky

Hypertension virtual trial is recruiting people 18+ who live with hypertension for a study that requires blood pressure readings. Read more here: http://curec.lk/2c4UI4b

Migraine relief trial is recruiting people 18-75 who suffer from from frequent migraines. See if you qualify http://curec.lk/2c4UI4b

There are a variety of types of research opportunities available, some that are simply survey based, use an app, want to track your data or actually test a treatment. I’d encourage you to be as involved in relevant medical research as you feel comfortable with.

The Luck of the (Blood) Draw

Last Saturday, Brad and I had our bi-annual blood draw and breakfast. An event where he inadvertently fasts with me, drives me to the lab to get blood drawn then takes me to out breakfast, because he’s a good husband.

Instead of going to the lab in our old neighborhood in order to visit our favorite breakfast spot near our old house, we decided to go to the one in Avon so we could run some errands after breakfast.

The lab was quiet and there were only a few of us going in to get stabbed tests that day, so they called me back along with another person and put us in cubes 2 and 3. There was some confusion when the phlebotomists came back because they thought it was cubes 1 and 2. But somehow I got lucky on that particular draw.

I put my arm out and she began looking for veins. Then she noticed my medical id that I almost didn’t put on that morning.

“What’s your bracelet for?” Continue reading

“Bless You!” {Allergy Season}

We have a thing in our house with sneezes, started by Brad of course.

Sneeze 1 = “Bless you!”

Sneeze 2 = “Bless you!'”

Sneeze 3 = “Faker!”

It lightens the mood a little during allergy season. I live with mild outdoor allergies and mild food/medication allergies. Brad lives with severe outdoor allergies. We are no strangers to sneezing, but between the two of us, Brad is the one with a love/hate relationship with the outdoors. On top of allergies, he’s quick to sunburn and the bugs think he’s more delicious than anything else. I actually sent him this cartoon (from Tastefully Offensive, you’ve been warned) after a day spent working outside and being inundated with pollen

We try to make our home a safe haven from allergies in a variety of ways, including keeping shoes off inside the house and opting not to have first-floor carpet. However, it’s impossible to hide from them. Especially this time of year when the outdoors beckon.

Blink Health sent me a cool infographic on allergies, that I figured I’d share. Continue reading

Tips and Tricks

Today’s the 5th and final day of Diabetes Blog Week, some may continue posting over the weekend for the wildcard topics, but I think I’ll wrap it up today. To be honest, with how infrequently I’ve been blogging lately, I’m surprised I’ve made it this whole week. Kudos to Karen for selecting topics that I could write about! Today’s topic is tips and tricks.

Let’s round out the week by sharing our best diabetes tips and diabetes tricks. From how you organize supplies to how you manage gear on the go/vacation (beach, or skiing, or whatever). From how you keep track of prescription numbers to how you remember to get your orders refilled. How about any “unconventional” diabetes practices, or ways to make diabetes work for YOU (not necessarily how the doctors say to do it!). There’s always something we can learn from each other. (Remember though, please no medical advice or dangerous suggestions.)

I love it when people share really helpful, actionable tips for dealing with diabetes in real life. Two years ago, we “hacked” diabetes and I shared a list of things that I do to make living with diabetes easier.

Medical  Management Tips Continue reading

Creating a Better Healthcare Experience

Today’s Diabetes Blog Week prompt is all about the healthcare experience. Here it is:

Most people who live with a chronic illness end up with a lot of experience when it comes to dealing with healthcare. How would you improve or change your healthcare experience? What would you like to see happening during medical visits with your healthcare team? How about when dealing with your health insurance companies? What’s your Healthcare Wish List or Biggest Frustration? Today is the day to share it all!

I have to acknowledge that I’m in an excellent place when it comes to healthcare. I truly have access to world class medical care living in Cleveland. Overall I have a good team and I can’t relate to all of the horror stories that I hear from others, but my care is not perfect.

There are always areas to improve. In U.S. healthcare, the first area to improve is insurance. Somehow in our twisted system, the insurance companies started determining care, not doctors. Pharmacies will literally fill prescriptions differently than written if the insurance company pushes back. Even doctors will bow to the demands of insurance. Continue reading