Healthcare in an Ideal World that For Some Reason Hasn’t Cured Diabetes

In an ideal world, diabetes wouldn’t exist. Neither would cancer or the myriad of other medical issues. In an ideal world, we wouldn’t need healthcare.

But in an ideal healthcare situation in a world that must include diabetes, here’s what I want:

Doctors who discuss care with their patients. I never again want to see a prescription for Humalog (when I take Apidra) sent to my retail pharmacy (when I use mail order) with an unfamiliar doctor’s name on it. Continue reading

Let’s Talk Medicine

The American Recall Center contacted me about this month being Talk About Your Medicines Month and offered me that cute little banner. I have so many thoughts about medications to share so I’ll break them up a little. I’ve worked with ARC before. And I’m not being compensated for this post, all opinions are my own and are not medical advice. 

The List

You know that little line on the bottom of your appointment reminder that says, “Bring a list of all your current medications with you”? How many of you actually bring a list of all your current medications?

The hospital group where all of my doctors are makes life incredibly easy with this because everything I’ve ever been prescribed by one of their doctors shows up on my chart and they go over what I’m still taking and what I need refilled. This goes for recommended supplements as well. My doctor told me to take vitamin D, even though he didn’t send a prescription to the pharmacy, it’s on my chart. But what about when I had my wisdom teeth out and my oral surgeon had me on a medication? If I didn’t say anything, they wouldn’t know and that could turn out badly.

Ask Questions
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It’s been awhile

It’s been awhile…

  1. since I stuck a piece of wire into my body with a large needle… and it hurt.
  2. since a device buzzing on my night stand woke me up.
  3. since I’ve needed to carry a receiver around with me.
  4. since I’ve had access to my blood sugar trends.
  5. since my old Dexcom stopped working… I can’t find where I put it.
  6. since I pressed the button on my G4 to turn on my screen. It takes a couple seconds huh?

If you can’t tell, I’m officially back to continuous glucose monitoring. I received a box full of Dexcom goodies yesterday and got everything up and running after work yesterday. I haven’t been back to it long enough to give an official report on my thoughts, but for now, I’m just happy to see my trends… and in color! (What a bonus!).

I’d like to think that blogging about not having a Dexcom helped… but at the end of the day, the cold, hard numbers and a fantastic letter from my endocrinologist probably pushed it over.

 

A High-Tech Life

I haven’t participated in the DSMA Blog Carnival in awhile… But this topic resonates with me. Diabetes Gadgets.

Here’s the prompt:

How do you select the diabetes devices you use?  To others looking into new or replacement devices, what would be your best advice to someone shopping around?

Brad and I talk about the gadgets and gear that keep me chugging along a lot. There are things that we wish would be different about them and things that we love… as much as you can love medical devices.

The Pump (The Pod)

Image Courtesy of Insulet

I’ve said in the past that I love my OmniPod… I don’t really though. I like the control and management I get by being on an insulin pump, but I shocked Brad’s socks off the other night when I said I would switch to a tubed pump if I don’t get the new OmniPod system soon and if I keep having pod failures (My recent failure rate is: 1 in 4 pods during filling or priming) . I followed that up by saying I wished there were more tubeless pumps on the market… I wish I had options. Right now, for someone like me who wants an insulin pump that they can wear, hide and not have tubing to deal with there aren’t options. There’s the OmniPod and… the OmniPod!

Overall it’s a good system even if the PDM looks like a kid’s toy of an old BlackBerry. I did a lot of research but really “found my moving buddy” when we learned about OmniPod. I didn’t want to deal with needles more than necessary, I didn’t want to get tangled in tube and I didn’t want to have to clip something to my clothes all the time.

Omni-Arm, out of the way during a service project

I found out that OmniPod “wastes” less insulin since there isn’t any caught up in the tube, so I’m saving liquid gold too… Although with my recent string of pod failures and only being able to get at most half of the insulin back from the podds I’m not sure about how much overall I’m saving.

I’ve had a lot of people ask me about my pod in their research… many go with OmniPod. So many that I wish I could get a commission from Insulet! (Or at least the new system. *wink*wink*)

The CGM

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D-Blog Week: Share and Don’t Share

Last year, I double-timed it for D-Blog Week. This year, I’ll see what I can do.

Often our health care team only sees us for about 15 minutes several times a year, and they might not have a sense of what our lives are really like. Today, let’s pretend our medical team is reading our blogs. What do you wish they could see about your and/or your loved one’s daily life with diabetes? On the other hand, what do you hope they don’t see?  (Thanks to Melissa Lee of Sweetly Voiced for this topic suggestion.)

When I go to any of my doctors, I feel like I turn into “super patient” and answer all questions precisely as if I’m being tested and just let the medicals lead the appointment. I’m married to a man with “white coat syndrome” so I know that’s not my issue, my issue is that I need to take control of my appointments. I did better at my last endocrinologist appointment, when I started a sentence with “while we’re talking, I need to ask you about travelling.”

I try to schedule my appointments online so it’s handy that I can type into the comments/reason for appointment box what I need to talk about and it ends up on my chart… whether or not that gets seen before I do, I don’t know.

Look at that! I’ve already strayed from the prompt!

What I wish they could see.

I wish they could see the life around my numbers. I mentioned about a year ago that I had an issue with a resident fixating on a string of low numbers and kept trying to change my basal programs to avoid them and somehow she didn’t understand they were outliers (because three days with lows in a row couldn’t be an outlier when you’re painting an entire house!). I explained over, and over, and over that those were not normal numbers. At that very point in time I wished I could snap her back to those days movie style so she could watch not only how active I was, how on top of treating those lows I was.

I wish that my healthcare team could see the things that I may not think to tell them about. I’m “new” at this whole living with diabetes thing and don’t always identify things they should know about. Although I doubt they should know about my sore neck from sleeping oddly, but I bet they should know about the tingly feeling in my hands that I only get in the mornings.

What I don’t want them to see. Continue reading