Managing Diabetes At Work

It’s sad that I have to say this, but completely necessary… I’m not a medical professional, this post (and all others) are not medical advice. I’m simply about to share with you about my experiences managing diabetes at work.

I observed a diabetes chat where readers submitted questions for a doctor and two people from diabetes nonprofits to answer. Someone asked for advice on managing diabetes at work because it is harder for them to manage at work than at home. I know there are no dumb questions when you’re trying to learn, but I couldn’t suppress my reflexive thought of well that’s a dumb question, just do it like you do at home. 

But after some self-scolding, I realized that for some it’s not so easy. To my relief one of the panelists said that management at work or school should be like management at home. Of course, I agree.

Making your health a priority can be tough for people, but the bottom line is that you need to do it. Your health and well being is important, both to you and your employer.

Me at work with my diabetes

I manage my type 1 diabetes at work exactly how I do at home, in this manner:

  • My diabetes bag is within arm’s reach
  • I check my blood sugar regularly and I check my Dexcom frequently
  • I eat when I need to
  • I bring my own healthy food to work (as opposed to going out)
  • I stay hydrated
  • I count carbs
  • I stop what I’m doing when diabetes must be handled

Sure there are extra hurdles to doing this at work instead of in the privacy of my own home, but you’ve got to do it. Continue reading

When I’m Old

At Christmastime we were visiting with my grandmother, who has Type 2, at her nursing home when it was almost time for dinner. One of the nurses came in to test her blood sugar and give her insulin for dinner. She asked my grandmother if she wanted us to leave. “Oh, it doesn’t bother me,” she responded. Grandma is a very laid-back lady. The nurse tested her blood sugar and recorded it, then asked if we would like to step out while she gave my grandmother a shot.

I kind of chuckled and said, “I have type 1 diabetes, if it doesn’t bother grandma, it doesn’t bother me.”

Let me tell you, the needle that she gave my grandmother her insulin with was huge

We wrapped up our visit to let grandma get to her dinner, but on the way home I told Brad, “If anyone ever came at me with a needle that big for insulin, I would probably hurt them.” Honestly the needle looked as large as the syringes I use to fill my pods.

Watson likes to rest on my pods (that’s my leg if you were wondering)

That got me thinking… what’s my life with diabetes going to look like when I’m old? Continue reading