Think Locally

With the election in just under a week, there was a bit of a break in presidential politics for us with the hurricane. The reprieve is already over and people are getting all fired up over who to vote for for president.

I can guarantee that there are people going out to vote who will ONLY vote for their presidential candidate and leave the rest of the ballot blank. That’s sad. If you know me in real life, you probably know that I believe informed voting is important.

State and local offices and issues have a more direct, immediate impact on you. Why would you not have your say in how your city, county and state operate?

I would ask that you take a few minutes between now and November 6th, to look up the local issues that will be on your ballots. Check out who is running for judge, what levies are up for vote and what issues you should have a say in. It’s easier that you’d think to find out what’s happening in your district. If you’re reading this blog, you have access to the internet and to the wide world of political resources. As voters in this election, we have the easiest access to information about what we, the people, are sounding off on.

Just because you’re fired up about who to vote for at the top of the ballot, doesn’t mean you should ignore the rest.

Not sure how to get started on research? Go to your favorite search engine and search “(your state/region) voter’s guide” or check out your local newspaper’s website.

Think Before You Speak (Tweet, Post, Etc.)

Those of us who work with social media and use it for ourselves face the challenge of keeping our accounts straight. For me this challenge isn’t very hard because I’m very conscientious of my social media usage. I also try to not come across as an idiot on my personal accounts too.

My bosses, my clients and my grandmother can find me very easily online and the last thing I want to do is look unprofessional or immature to any of them. Also, I’d very much like to add value to the internet with what I do.

During last night’s debate, the KitchenAid Twitter account featured a very unprofessional, rude and grammatically unsound, tweet that promoted a lot of bad things being said about people who do what I do (that would be operate social media accounts on behalf of companies). There’s already been a significant amount of age-ist commentary about having 20-somethings run a company’s social media efforts.

This article, with the headline: KitchenAid Tweet Shows, Yet Again, Why Social Needs Mature Talent made me cringe. Someone who typically acts as the voice for a brand screwed up and made the rest of us look bad… again.

This is the bottom line as far as I’m concerned: Think before you speak.

Pausing before sending a tweet is enough to help you realize that you’re logged into the wrong account or that you’re about to let your emotions, strong opinions or whatever else take over and make you look like a fool.

I may not always act professional on my own social accounts, but I strive to act like a mature human being. Something that KitchenAid should look for in a replacement community manager for their Twitter account.

 

The Most Political Post I’ll Ever Write

When I turned 18, one of the first orders of business was to register to vote.

I was much more into politics in high school than I am now, however that doesn’t mean I’m uninformed. I pay attention so that I’m not just touching squares on a screen on election day.

I feel very strongly about voting, as much as an inconvenience as it can cause or as rude as some poll workers can be, doing it is important. I’m not going to tell you who to vote for, who I’m voting for or entertain any political debates.

Vote.

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I was working as a lifeguard at a YMCA on the first election when I could vote. I stopped at my polling place and voted on my way into work. I saved my “I Voted Today” sticker and put it on my shirt so that I could wear it on my shift and display that I had exercised my right to say who I wanted in office and what issues I supported. Unfortunately, not many of my peers were as excited to exercise this right.

As I get older, more of my friends vote in each election.

Are you registered to vote? If not, there is still time.

(I wrote this before I realized that today is National Voter Registration Day)