Meal Ideas

We have some dinners at our place planned with friends so I turned to Twitter asking about the Go-To meals they make when people are coming over. I got some great responses that made me hungry… I thought I’d share the idea gold with you!

  1. Lasagna. This is a great idea, I’m not a fan of lasagna in general, but I’ve run across some recipes (on Pinterest of course) I think I might like. Brad loves it and it’s a nice cold weather food.
  2. Burgers on the BBQ. These are a K-fam favorite that we often asked for prior to becoming the owners of Monster Grill. If weather checks out, it’s top of the list along with the beloved cheesy potatoes. (Recommended with a big salad)
  3. Roast. Easy to prepare in the Crock Pot, no one minds leftovers either. (Also recommended with a big salad)
  4. Salad, pizza and wings. This was recommended by a local pizza place (that has good food at 2am… I may or may not know for a fact). It’s a great idea for food that accompanies game night or airing a sporting event on the big screen. Bonus: I wouldn’t have to cook!
  5. Chicken in a red wine sauce with red mashed potatoes and sauteed spinach. My mouth watered at that recommendation and that’s all I have to add.
  6. Anything in the slow cooker. I love my crock pot, I also love being able to do a little prep and have a wonderful meal with little work. Very helpful for company because you don’t get locked in the kitchen making it.

What about you? What are you go-to meals for company?

Or for an average day?

Think Before You Speak (Tweet, Post, Etc.)

Those of us who work with social media and use it for ourselves face the challenge of keeping our accounts straight. For me this challenge isn’t very hard because I’m very conscientious of my social media usage. I also try to not come across as an idiot on my personal accounts too.

My bosses, my clients and my grandmother can find me very easily online and the last thing I want to do is look unprofessional or immature to any of them. Also, I’d very much like to add value to the internet with what I do.

During last night’s debate, the KitchenAid Twitter account featured a very unprofessional, rude and grammatically unsound, tweet that promoted a lot of bad things being said about people who do what I do (that would be operate social media accounts on behalf of companies). There’s already been a significant amount of age-ist commentary about having 20-somethings run a company’s social media efforts.

This article, with the headline: KitchenAid Tweet Shows, Yet Again, Why Social Needs Mature Talent made me cringe. Someone who typically acts as the voice for a brand screwed up and made the rest of us look bad… again.

This is the bottom line as far as I’m concerned: Think before you speak.

Pausing before sending a tweet is enough to help you realize that you’re logged into the wrong account or that you’re about to let your emotions, strong opinions or whatever else take over and make you look like a fool.

I may not always act professional on my own social accounts, but I strive to act like a mature human being. Something that KitchenAid should look for in a replacement community manager for their Twitter account.

 

Find a Friend

I’m participating in the 3rd Annual Diabetes Blog Week. This is my first year (clearly) participating and I’m pretty excited to take part in this online community event. Anyway, onto today’s topic:

Find A Friend

I didn’t really know anyone with Type 1 diabetes when I was first diagnosed so I turned to my trusty friend Twitter a few weeks out of the hospital and searched for “diabetes.”

The first two Twitter users who popped up were Kerri at Six Until Me and Allison who writes for Diabetes Mine. From following these two and reading their posts, I found a whole slew of people who comprise this thing called the DOC (Diabetes Online Community).

I feel like there are far too many diabetes bloggers that I’ve come to read regularly (and occasionally comment on) so I’ll just share with you a few of the first connections I made after Kerri and Allison.

  • Cherise, the founder of DSMA and a fellow pod person, answered all sorts of questions for me when I was looking into an insulin pump
  • Stacy, the Girl with the Portable Pancreas, was also a great question answerer and the amazing retweeter of all blog diabetes-related and overall awesome
  • Kim, of Texting My Pancreas and the brains behind The You Can Do This Project, gave me my first digital high five for a perfect 100 blood sugar reading

I wouldn’t know any of these ladies without the aid of the internet. Not a single one of them is in Ohio. Luckily, the internet lead me to another NEO T1 blogger: Lisa of Lisa From Scratch. Lisa and I have yet to meet in person (but we totally should), but it’s comforting to know there’s another diagnosed as an adult, type one lady living it up in Cleveland.

One of my favorite pastimes is clicking through the d-blog links. It helps us know we aren’t alone.

Stay tuned tomorrow for one good thing.

How did you get here?

Where did you come from?

I’m actually not being philosophical, I’m being slightly shallow. Chances are you dropped by this blog by way of Facebook? Which means you’re more likely to comment on its content on my Facebook.

Maybe you found me through Twitter or you’re on the cutting edge and found a post on Google Plus or maybe you just “Stumbled Upon” this blog… I’m frequently entertained by the traffic drivers to my site, specifically when it comes to search terms.

Here are some of my favorite search terms:

Getting pregnant saved my life

dog dopound (spelling error included) Continue reading

Twitter as customer service

The customer has it figured out, but companies are neglecting it!

Twitter is like word-of-mouth advertising (one of the fastest growing areas of communication) but the kicker here is that companies can and should respond (to good and bad) tweets about them. And they aren’t.

Honestly, we vent on Twitter when we have a bad experience and it’s a golden and free opportunity to make things right for a customer. And the customer wants them to respond!

Based on this study by Maritz Research, only 1/3 of the people they surveyed who had tweeted a complaint received a response. 86% of those who didn’t receive a response wanted one.

As a customer, I would rather tweet at you than call customer service and get put on hold.