Looking Back: At Shoes

I’m doing a little happy dance that this “controversial” story I’m quoted in went live yesterday. I had the amazing opportunity of sharing last winter’s blog post about being a shoes-off house with an Associated Press editor, who included me, my blog and our “mud room” in the story.

My “Mud Room” is green. Are you surprised?

If you followed a link here… Hi! And welcome.

We’re still a shoes-off house and will remain so, no matter how rude some people think it is. Around the holidays visiting increases, and being asked to remove your shoes when you enter someone’s home shouldn’t be a surprise. All of my Millennial generations friends whose houses and apartments I’ve been to are shoes-off. It’s common, so when you come over, feel free to bring slippers or sport some crazy socks!

And if you’re “needing” the height of a heeled shoe, think about this: I am 4′ 11″ tall and have never once felt the need to compensate with shoes when visiting friends.

Please Take Off Your Shoes

There are two types of households (okay there are probably more but humor me please): Shoes-on and shoes-off.

The K-Couple has a shoes-off home. To some this is completely normal, to others it’s strange. I sometimes feel like a criminal for stopping people at the door when they visit and asking for them to remove their shoes. I feel that having a shoes-off home requires explanation sometimes for understanding. The fact that “it’s my house and I say so” doesn’t fly with many.

Before I explain our reasoning, please know this, if you operate a shoes-on home, I’m not judging you. I did not grow up in a shoes-off home, but was taught to stop at the entry way and inquire whether I should remove my shoes before walking into someone’s home.

So why are we a shoes-free household?

Read the rest of the post, and the list, here.

 

PS: Shoes are outerwear!