8 Things Not to Do As a Guest In Someone’s House

It’s easy to think that everyone treats their home the same way you treat yours, but that’s not a safe assumption to make. It’s always best to err on the side of overly polite when you visit someone. There are things that you may do that drive the person you’re visiting crazy, but they’re too polite to mention it.

Here are some things to not do when visiting someone else’s home:

1. Do not go to the side door, back door or door from the garage to the house. Especially if it’s your first time at someone’s house. Go directly to the front door. This is the main entrance to the house and the place where you’ll typically find the doorbell and welcome mat. When you’ve reached the back/garage door entry point with a family, you’ll know. Also, the last thing you want to do is stand in the rain at someone’s back door because they’re upstairs and can’t hear you knock, but are listening for the doorbell.

2. Do not take more than 2 steps into someone’s home without asking if they’d like you to remove your shoes. I say two steps because that’s far enough to close the door behind you but doesn’t typically get you off the rug or tile at the door and onto carpet. This goes for any flooring choices. We have all solid flooring on our first floor and you still aren’t allowed to wear shoes in my house. If the hosts says not to worry about it, then don’t. But if they’re a shoes-off house like mine, they will truly appreciate it. Continue reading

How to Act Around Short People

The common-sense, how-to act around short people is:

Treat short people the same as average and above-average height people.

duh

18-year-old me

But apparently this sense is not common enough.

As a fully grown woman who doesn’t quite break the 5-foot mark, I regularly get patted on the head like a puppy, people “zoom” their hands at my head to indicate how short I am and a goodbye hug at family Christmas resulted in me having to tell the relative to put me down. I’ve been used as an arm rest and been told that I should leave the tall guys for the tall girls.

It’s clear that people lose their manners and their minds around those of us who are not “normal” height. So, here are a few pointers on how not to be a jerk about someone’s naturally short stature: Continue reading

June Reads

Happy July Friends!

I’m a little behind on my extracurricular because… well live first, blog second. I was the happy recipient of a Sunshine Blog Award and have not forgotten what that entails! I also owe someone a guest blog… but I did read/see some great stuff in June, so here’s a brief list.

What’s Hot in Wearable Technology.

I’ve ranted a bit about the size issues of wearable technology, but I’m still intrigued by what is and will eventually be out there. Google Glass has been a lot of fun so far to play with and has come in handy for more than a few things, such as a very steady video of my mother’s wedding.

This article is interesting to me because I can’t immerse myself completely in tech blogs since I don’t speak that language (gasp!) and I don’t really get into all of the details when it comes to resolution, memory, software and speed comparisons – but don’t worry I’ve got a guy for that. I liked this blog post because it was written by a communication pro… that’s a language I understand! SCiO in particular intrigues me… get nutrition information from scanning food? That’s pretty cool. Continue reading

Looking Back: At Shoes

I’m doing a little happy dance that this “controversial” story I’m quoted in went live yesterday. I had the amazing opportunity of sharing last winter’s blog post about being a shoes-off house with an Associated Press editor, who included me, my blog and our “mud room” in the story.

My “Mud Room” is green. Are you surprised?

If you followed a link here… Hi! And welcome.

We’re still a shoes-off house and will remain so, no matter how rude some people think it is. Around the holidays visiting increases, and being asked to remove your shoes when you enter someone’s home shouldn’t be a surprise. All of my Millennial generations friends whose houses and apartments I’ve been to are shoes-off. It’s common, so when you come over, feel free to bring slippers or sport some crazy socks!

And if you’re “needing” the height of a heeled shoe, think about this: I am 4′ 11″ tall and have never once felt the need to compensate with shoes when visiting friends.

Please Take Off Your Shoes

There are two types of households (okay there are probably more but humor me please): Shoes-on and shoes-off.

The K-Couple has a shoes-off home. To some this is completely normal, to others it’s strange. I sometimes feel like a criminal for stopping people at the door when they visit and asking for them to remove their shoes. I feel that having a shoes-off home requires explanation sometimes for understanding. The fact that “it’s my house and I say so” doesn’t fly with many.

Before I explain our reasoning, please know this, if you operate a shoes-on home, I’m not judging you. I did not grow up in a shoes-off home, but was taught to stop at the entry way and inquire whether I should remove my shoes before walking into someone’s home.

So why are we a shoes-free household?

Read the rest of the post, and the list, here.

 

PS: Shoes are outerwear!

Wediquette

As a former bridesmaid, maid of honor, bride and now matron of honor and guest during Wedding Season 2013, it’s very, very clear to me that the average person is not aware of what is, and isn’t, appropriate behavior surrounding the happiest day of someone’s life. So it’s my pleasure to get on my soap box and share some advice with you, the internet, on how to be a nice wedding guest.

Here are 10 fairly simple things to remember when attending a wedding:

  1. It is never, ever, ever, ever, ever appropriate for a woman to wear a white dress to a wedding if she is not the bride, a flower girl or a British bridesmaid. Sure, some clothes have white in them, that’s not a huge deal. A white lace dress? Big, HUGE no no. Pick another color and save the white for church or a graduation or something that isn’t a wedding. Also plan on nixing anything that is “cream” or “off white” from your wedding guest wardrobe. Wearing a white dress is just plain rude. (If you think I sound adamant about this, you’re right. I see this happen over and over again and wonder why girls do it. Maybe they don’t know? So I’m spreading the wediquette.) Continue reading