The language of diabetes

Today’s Diabetes Blog Week Prompt is all about language and diabetes. Here’s the prompt:

There is an old saying that states “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me”. I’m willing to bet we’ve all disagreed with this at some point, and especially when it comes to diabetes. Many advocate for the importance of using non-stigmatizing, inclusive and non-judgmental language when speaking about or to people with diabetes. For some, they don’t care, others care passionately. Where do you stand when it comes to “person with diabetes” versus “diabetic”, or “checking” blood sugar versus “testing”, or any of the tons of other examples? Let’s explore the power of words, but please remember to keep things respectful.

I love that it’s a prompt about words that needs to ask people to be respectful. Words get folks all riled up sometimes. I work in PR/marketing communications, let me tell you, we have debates about single commas in come of the things that we develop, so of course word choice is important. I’m one of the folks that the above prompt refers to when saying, “May advocate  for the importance of using non-stigmatizing, inclusive and non-judgmental language when speaking about or to people with diabetes.”

I wrote a post about it for Diabetes Mine today, so please head on over there and read it when you’re done here… Continue reading

Airport security, US customs and general travel thoughts

My new husband and I had some travel adventures with our honeymoon. We were on planes, in taxis, on a Jamaican shuttle, in a Mexican rental car, boats and of course my least favorite escalators! Travel overall excites me, but sometimes there are hassles on top of general weirdness.

The Airports

We left out of good old CAK, the small airport close to home where security takes about 5 minutes to get through. When I walked barefoot in simple shorts and a t-shirt through the metal detector, it beeped and the TSA agent pulled me aside. Did I really set this off? I thought, then this conversation occurred: Continue reading