Tech-ed Out

So my diabetes gadgets were Out of Warranty and I had planned to keep it that way as I wait for better technology. Hope draws closer as people are actually being enrolled in the first tubeless artificial pancreas trials (wish one of the clinics were here in Cleveland!). But I’m halfway back under a warranty.

My Dexcom gave the dreaded, “transmitter battery low, reorder soon” message. So I called my medical supply company. After a slightly frustrating conversation where I had to repeat myself four times and spell the word “low” the lady said she’d get the paperwork in for me to get a new Dexcom G4 system. “Since I’m getting a whole new system, let’s put in paperwork for the Dexcom G5 please.” (Because who wants new-old technology?)

She put in the order and I anticipated full transmitter battery death was imminent and prepared to fly blind for a week or so without my CGM. Thankfully, that didn’t happen.

I got the call that I expected from the medical supply company. Continue reading

What I’m Thinking After Five Years with Type 1 Diabetes

Today is my 5th diaversary.

In May, I was invited to be part of an adults with type 1 diabetes panel at a local JDRF event. I wasn’t the youngest person on the panel, but I’d had type 1 the shortest amount of time as I was the only one diagnosed as an adult. I was asked to share about the adjustment to life with type 1 as an adult, so I gave my abbreviated diagnosis story.

I talked about the time five years ago as a recent college grad and new wife. I listed out the symptoms I was experiencing: unquenchable thirst, peeing all the time, tired, blurry vision, weight loss, vomiting… “My husband finally convinced me to go to the doctor,” I told the audience. “And they gave me a pregnancy test.” The audience had a visible physical reaction to that statement. Everyone present knew those symptoms, knew what they meant and expected me to say that when I went to the doctor they diagnosed me with diabetes right away, the pregnancy test was a surprise to them.

As I sit here in the middle of my season of 5th year milestones, I have trouble believing that five whole years have passed. And in the next minute, it’s hard to believe that only five years have passed because it feels like a life time. There’s a lot that I’m thinking about on my 5th diaversary. Continue reading

Out of Warranty

I’m still wearing the first insulin pump I ever got… sort of. Since I started pumping with OmniPod in December of 2011, I’ve had two generations of pods and at least 5 PDMs, but as far as Insulet and my insurance are concerned, I’ve been out of warranty since December.

I think I’m going to stay that way for awhile too.

I like my OmniPod and don’t really want to switch off of it. I could choose to re-up on OmniPod and get myself a new PDM and keep the old one as a back up, but to do so would essentially lock me into OmniPod for another four years. I feel like we have finally reached a point in technology and development that there are actually new and significantly better things around the corner. Continue reading

Guest Post: Learning to deal with my own diabetes

When you’re diagnosed with type 1 at 22 like I was, your diabetes management starts out as all your own. There is no adolescent journey to independent care. A fact for which I’m sometimes thankful. Growing up is difficult enough, I don’t know what it’s like having diabetes added to that mix, but my guest blogger today knows exactly what it was like.

Corinne, the brain’s behind an award-winning diabetes life hack, Pumpstash, is sharing her story about learning to manage her type 1 diabetes on her own. (Corinne was recently named one of the winners of the DiabetesMine Patient Voices Contest. Just a reminder, I do a little work for them.)

Meet Corinne

My name is Corinne Logan, I am a 20 year old college student, have had type 1 diabetes for  almost 19 years, and been on the insulin pump for 14 years. Looking back through middle school and high school there are so pretty cringe worthy moments, from bad outfits, to dumb behavior, to learning how to deal with my diabetes on my own and figuring out what role it played in my daily life.

When I was 12 or 13 I was convinced I was mature and responsible enough to handle my life on my own. Nevermind that I couldn’t drive, had no income, and essentially had no clue what I was doing. This new quest for independence included wanting to handle my diabetes on my own. I didn’t want to have to call my Mom to confirm boluses, have my parents be in charge of my supplies, or calculate the best pre-sport practice snack. Just as I wasn’t ready to be responsible for myself in non-diabetes ways, I definitely wasn’t ready to handle diabetes on my own. Continue reading

One Box

The other day, I was anxiously awaiting the arrival of the UPS delivery man. I was expecting a box… a very large box.

As I held the very large box, I thought about what was inside. Continue reading