Making the Right Financial Moves When Medical Emergencies Arrive

Today I have another guest post, from personal finance blogger Josh Wilson at FamilyFaithFinance.com.

Medical bills can be a nightmare. A night in the emergency room or bad news from a doctor can mean thousands of dollars taken from your bank account or even harm to your credit score. But, since medical bills don’t go straight to your credit score, there are some moves to make within the first 90 days after an emergency occurs.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau reports that about half of all collection accounts on credit reports actually come from medical debt. The report also said that a single collection can cause a decent credit score to fall about 100 points. Many patients don’t even realize how quick a medical bill can damage their credit.

Other misconceptions include: Continue reading

Guest Post: Learning to deal with my own diabetes

When you’re diagnosed with type 1 at 22 like I was, your diabetes management starts out as all your own. There is no adolescent journey to independent care. A fact for which I’m sometimes thankful. Growing up is difficult enough, I don’t know what it’s like having diabetes added to that mix, but my guest blogger today knows exactly what it was like.

Corinne, the brain’s behind an award-winning diabetes life hack, Pumpstash, is sharing her story about learning to manage her type 1 diabetes on her own. (Corinne was recently named one of the winners of the DiabetesMine Patient Voices Contest. Just a reminder, I do a little work for them.)

Meet Corinne

My name is Corinne Logan, I am a 20 year old college student, have had type 1 diabetes for  almost 19 years, and been on the insulin pump for 14 years. Looking back through middle school and high school there are so pretty cringe worthy moments, from bad outfits, to dumb behavior, to learning how to deal with my diabetes on my own and figuring out what role it played in my daily life.

When I was 12 or 13 I was convinced I was mature and responsible enough to handle my life on my own. Nevermind that I couldn’t drive, had no income, and essentially had no clue what I was doing. This new quest for independence included wanting to handle my diabetes on my own. I didn’t want to have to call my Mom to confirm boluses, have my parents be in charge of my supplies, or calculate the best pre-sport practice snack. Just as I wasn’t ready to be responsible for myself in non-diabetes ways, I definitely wasn’t ready to handle diabetes on my own. Continue reading