Holding in a Sneeze: My weird week without my husband

It was Friday morning and I’m sitting at my desk with my face screwed up and trying to hold in a sneeze that was brewing. I know you aren’t supposed to hold in your sneezes, it’s not healthy. But I knew, if that sneeze came out it would start my nose bleeding again. I see enough of my own blood on a daily basis, I really didn’t need it to start coming out of my face… again.

It had been a weird week already so a perfect way to cap it off was appearing like I was on the verge of tears because that stupid sneeze was trying to form.

Brad was in Canada for work most of the week so I was on my own. Continue reading

Using Your Opinion for Good

I’m excited to introduce a new diabetes blog series and the awesome organization making it happen. Op4G is a market research panel company which stands for Opinions for Good. When someone joins an Op4G panel, they have the option to select a nonprofit that they want to support from a list of 300+ non-profits) and when they complete a survey, a portion of the incentive goes directly to the nonprofit. So far, Op4G has donated over $447,000 to non-profits.

Op4G is open to the general population, however they are working to form niche health communities… starting with diabetes. Op4G partners with organizations with research needs that focus on diabetes, while also giving you a way to contribute your voice to research on products and services that could impact you in the future. They’ve teamed up with me to produce a series of diabetes-related blog posts so this is a win, win, win, win kind of series (4 wins there). Continue reading

The High Cost of Care

Welcome to Day 2 of Diabetes Blog Week.

Insulin and other diabetes medications and supplies can be costly.  Here in the US, insurance status and age (as in Medicare eligibility) can impact both the cost and coverage.  So today, let’s discuss how cost impacts our diabetes care.  Do you have advice to share?  For those outside the US, is cost a concern?  Are there other factors such as accessibility or education that cause barriers to your diabetes care?

As I thought about this post, I felt the urge to start with a disclaimer or an apology. But I’ll start with thankfulness. I may complain about having been forced into an insulin that doesn’t work as well for me or having to wait on hold to get a real person to talk to about my supplies, my medicine or my next appointment. But at the end of the day, I’m very lucky when it comes to diabetes costs.

And I don’t use “lucky” in a flippant manner. I generally refuse to refer to myself as being lucky, blessed (or in some other way gifted what I need) to be where I am in my life when it comes to career, home and relationship. I work hard and make choices to get to where I am. But when it comes to the access to what I need to not only stay alive but be healthy, I’m really lucky. I have insurance, I have an HSA, I have the means to pay my high deductible and I have the best medical care in the world right in my back yard. That, my friends, feels a lot like luck.

High Monetary Cost Continue reading

Diabetes is the definition of insanity

It’s officially Diabetes Blog Week! I’m looking forward to contributing to the conversation as many days this week as possible. Today’s prompt is:

Diabetes can sometimes seem to play by a rulebook that makes no sense, tossing out unexpected challenges at random.  What are your best tips for being prepared when the unexpected happens?  Or, take this topic another way and tell us about some good things diabetes has brought into your, or your loved one’s, life that you never could have expected?

Albert Einstein is credited with saying that insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. The whole concept of doing to the same thing over and getting different results sounds more than a little like life with type 1 diabetes. I can do the exact same things each day, at the exact same time and eat exactly the same foods, taking exactly the same amount of insulin and my numbers will never be the same.

Type 1 diabetes = insanity. I do the same thing over and over and have to expect a different result otherwise I will literally go insane. This disease is maddening, especially if you’re like me and have a healthy appreciation for order. These past five years I’ve learned some tough lessons in flexibility, discipline and taking deep breaths.

I’d like to hit both points in the prompt and give you the best return on your time for reading my first DBlog Week post. Continue reading

Did you know April is Stress Awareness Month?

I didn’t until yesterday. It’s fitting because let me tell you, this spring has been a little rough and April proved to be a trying month. I’m kind of glad to be saying goodbye to this month.

March ended with a bang in the form of a heart attack.My mother suffered a coronary spasm that she first thought was an allergic reaction. Here’s the thing about heart attacks, you never rarely expect to have one… until you do. Continue reading