New Job – Thanks Diabetes

A new “Are you diabetic?”

The girl I’d just met a couple of hours before on the dock of our rented lake house stepped just inside the door of my bedroom as I unpacked my duffel bag. I, along with 8 other girls, was spending the weekend at a lake in upstate New York to celebrate the upcoming wedding of our friend. I felt a little like an outsider in the group because I only really knew the bride and maid of honor before the trip. I’d met a couple of the other girls before and the rest were strangers.

My Dexcom sensor peeked out of the leg of my shorts from its site on my thigh. “Yes,” I responded simply.

“So do you wear a Dexcom?” she asked.  Continue reading

Climbing Everest – Type One Nation Summit 2018

I was able to attend JDRF NEO’s Type One Nation Summit this year and it was refreshing to be in rooms full of people who deal with the same things I do. I don’t have much in-person contact with other people who have type 1 so I often feel like the weird one in the room.

Climbing Everest

This year’s keynote speaker was mountain climber Will Cross. Will has climbed mountains on every continent, walked to the North Pole, walked to the South Pole and submitted Everest – all while living with type 1 diabetes. It was an inspiring speech. I tweeted some highlights from the DiabetesMine account.  Continue reading

Working Your Illness Into Your Side Hustle

This post is sponsored by Op4G, the research partner that lets you use your opinion for good. They’ve established a research community for people with diabetes to have a voice in future diabetes treatment developments, make a little extra cash and support nonprofit organizations. Sign up to be part of the community.

Nowadays ( <- wow I feel old typing that) it seems that most people don’t have just one job anymore. You’ve probably heard terms like: side hustle, gig economy, extra income, freelancing, etc. a lot more in recent years. A lot of people are taking more control over their lives and their finances through doing more things.

A lot of people, like myself, work a normal full time job and spend a good chunk of their spare time doing other things that earn money. Other people have built whole careers on these independent projects. These things range from freelance writing, editing, coding, graphic design, etc to taking surveys, mystery shopping, operating a money-making blog (not all blogs make money) or even mining Bitcoin.

People who live with chronic illnesses often have opportunities to earn money related to their conditions. Continue reading

Asking Questions and Giving Feedback

This post is sponsored by Op4G, the research partner that lets you use your opinion for good. They’ve established a research community for people with diabetes to have a voice in future diabetes treatment developments, make a little extra cash and support nonprofit organizations. Sign up to be part of the community.

You know how whenever your computer is acting up, the moment the IT guy comes to take a look at it, it starts working perfectly?

That’s kind of what it feels like when I go to the doctor. I know everything that’s going on, specifically what’s going wrong, and when I get into the appointment, it seems to fly right out of my head. Which is why the best thing I’ve done for my appointments is keep a running list of questions and thoughts on my phone to discuss at the appointment.

Asking questions and providing feedback are two critical parts of being an engaged patient. Continue reading

Ways to Get Involved in Research

This post is sponsored by Op4G, the research partner that lets you use your opinion for good. They’ve established a research community for people with diabetes to have a voice in future diabetes treatment developments, make a little extra cash and support nonprofit organizations. Sign up to be part of the community.

When you live with a chronic medical condition like type 1 diabetes, it’s easy to give up on the idea of ever being cured. But science continues to progress so there’s hope. If not for a cure, then at least for better treatment.

That progression is due to research… which requires patients like us. There are a variety of ways to be involved in research for cures and treatment. Here are five that you could consider: Continue reading