Super Bowl 50: Snack & Ads

This is the first year I’ve actually known what the Super Bowl number was because they cut the Roman numerals… “L” just isn’t impressive under “Super Bowl.”

Someone asked me who I was rooting for, the Panthers, Broncos or Snacks & Ads. I had to pick “snacks & ads” because I spent the evening on Twitter commenting on the ads. Here’s my quick rundown…

The Super Bowel

I was surprised to see the Pharma ads, which leaned very heavily toward the bowel end of the industry with the OIC and Xifaxan.

The Expected Continue reading

Twitter Bowl

One of my favorite days of the year on Twitter is Super Bowl Sunday. A bunch of commercial watchers tweet the brand bowl, some of us are clearly marcom folks and others are not. I tweeted last night with the #brandbowl  hashtag but there were so many hashtags floating around that I have to plead: Can we just pick one?

Instead of running down some commercials as I have in the past, I have some observations on the social media side.

1. I thought the hashtagged commercials had disappeared… then sometime during the second quarter the hashtags returned. Aside from the #EsuranceSave30, how many of the hashtags were really used? And what is with the changing hashtag for CarMax? #slowclap to #slowbark? If it was an attempt at getting something animal in, I’m not sure it was terribly successful.

2. People who want to act like they have authority to comment on the ads should probably watch the ads and tweet the right brand when they praise or criticize them. I saw a lot of car company names used interchangeably.

3. I noticed that a lot of brands still don’t *get* social media, the internet and human behavior in general. For example, hashtags don’t have spaces and if you have to the audience to make you viral, you’re doing it wrong. 

Brands

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Best Friend or Big Brother?

People tend to get creeped out when they learn of stores tracking their shopping habits. Like when Target can predict a pregnancy. As a communications professional, I find these things interesting, but when I shared about it on my Facebook (a long time ago) a lot of people commented that tracking customer spending habits is “creepy” or an “invasion of privacy.”

In our culture we knowingly shop with trackable practices. We use credit cards. We use loyalty cards. We like free stuff. We like good deals. Why do many feel it’s gone too far to follow our habits and give us what we want?

I registered my Giant Eagle loyalty card online to start loading automatic discounts to my card for effortless grocery couponing. Not too long afterward we got a great set of personalized coupons in the mail along with a “rewards statement” tracking how much we’d saved on weekly specials, fuel perks and food perks. Each coupon was for something that we regularly purchase, like $1 off any produce or $1 off meat or cheese from the deli counter. There were six in total and the next time I was at the grocery store, I used five of them. We continue to receive coupons  based on our regular shopping habits and when I bought groceries on Tuesday I saved an extra $6 from these personalized offers.

We get free drinks at Starbucks because we registered our card and let them keep a log of how many drink we purchase.

There’s a mutually beneficial relationship in these sorts of programs. Stores can find out what they’re regular customers want the most or what hardly ever leaves their shelves. They can win over business by offering you discounts on products that you might need for the next stage of your life or for your next cookout. As a consumer, you can save money at the places you already shop and improve your relationship with their regular haunts.

Sure some tracking sounds like Big Brother, but does sending you coupons mean that companies are going to steal your personal information? Do loyalty programs mean that a store can control your actions?

No and No.

It’s a tactic for building better relationships because after all, Marketing 101 (103 if you took my Intro to Marketing class) tells you that it’s way less expensive to maintain a relationship with a customer you already have than to build a whole new relationship with a whole new customer.

The brands just want to be your best friend… or some sort of friend.

Still feeling a bit paranoid? Don’t want to be tracked? Then don’t use a loyalty card when you shop and pay with cash.