Twitter Bowl

One of my favorite days of the year on Twitter is Super Bowl Sunday. A bunch of commercial watchers tweet the brand bowl, some of us are clearly marcom folks and others are not. I tweeted last night with the #brandbowl  hashtag but there were so many hashtags floating around that I have to plead: Can we just pick one?

Instead of running down some commercials as I have in the past, I have some observations on the social media side.

1. I thought the hashtagged commercials had disappeared… then sometime during the second quarter the hashtags returned. Aside from the #EsuranceSave30, how many of the hashtags were really used? And what is with the changing hashtag for CarMax? #slowclap to #slowbark? If it was an attempt at getting something animal in, I’m not sure it was terribly successful.

2. People who want to act like they have authority to comment on the ads should probably watch the ads and tweet the right brand when they praise or criticize them. I saw a lot of car company names used interchangeably.

3. I noticed that a lot of brands still don’t *get* social media, the internet and human behavior in general. For example, hashtags don’t have spaces and if you have to the audience to make you viral, you’re doing it wrong. 

Brands

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Three Years of Twitter

Sometime in the wee hours of the morning, I received this tweet:

It’s my twitter birthday today… who knew? I’ve been on Twitter for three years, when you think about it, three years isn’t very long. The first public tweet was sent a little over six and a half years ago.

No one can claim that Twitter is new anymore. My use of Twitter has mostly grown and changed over the last three years, including a handle change and all of the format changes. I remember in the weeks that I first started using it (on my BlackBerry no less!) I made sure the read every tweet in my timeline. It’d probably have blown my mind to know that now I scan the timeline and gain just as much, if not more, information.

Without that TwBirthday tweet, today would have gone unnoticed which is totally okay. But it’s cool to think about the beginning of things compared to how they are now.

Would you celebrate the anniversary of joining Twitter, Facebook or another social site?

Think Before You Speak (Tweet, Post, Etc.)

Those of us who work with social media and use it for ourselves face the challenge of keeping our accounts straight. For me this challenge isn’t very hard because I’m very conscientious of my social media usage. I also try to not come across as an idiot on my personal accounts too.

My bosses, my clients and my grandmother can find me very easily online and the last thing I want to do is look unprofessional or immature to any of them. Also, I’d very much like to add value to the internet with what I do.

During last night’s debate, the KitchenAid Twitter account featured a very unprofessional, rude and grammatically unsound, tweet that promoted a lot of bad things being said about people who do what I do (that would be operate social media accounts on behalf of companies). There’s already been a significant amount of age-ist commentary about having 20-somethings run a company’s social media efforts.

This article, with the headline: KitchenAid Tweet Shows, Yet Again, Why Social Needs Mature Talent made me cringe. Someone who typically acts as the voice for a brand screwed up and made the rest of us look bad… again.

This is the bottom line as far as I’m concerned: Think before you speak.

Pausing before sending a tweet is enough to help you realize that you’re logged into the wrong account or that you’re about to let your emotions, strong opinions or whatever else take over and make you look like a fool.

I may not always act professional on my own social accounts, but I strive to act like a mature human being. Something that KitchenAid should look for in a replacement community manager for their Twitter account.

 

How to lose fans and allienate supporters

Lately some sort of flu is going around the social media community that ticks me off. It causes community managers (or the intern or volunteer people put in charge of Facebook and Twitter) to host a giveaway and announce that the X number liker or follower will win a prize. I have been know to unlike and unfollow brands that do this.

Seriously?

You want to get more supporters and gain a larger social audience… I follow you so far. But giving away a gift card to the 2,000th (or whatever) person who likes your page, follows you, etc. is a slap in the face from those who have been with you from the beginning… you know before you started giving away free stuff?

Follower/fan drives, can be an effective way to get more visibility online… but not at the expense of losing the people who actually stand behind your brand.

So shift your focus off the exact numerical “supporter” and instead do a drawing… the fair way, that your supporters can all get excited about.

Your message should be, “We’re excited to reach X number of fans/followers soon. Once we hit X number, we’ll draw the name of one (or more!) of our supporters to win a prize!”

It seems so incredibly simple and fair to me.

Don’t forget to say thanks to the people who make (or break) your brand online.

Who out there is doing this well?

Twitter as customer service

The customer has it figured out, but companies are neglecting it!

Twitter is like word-of-mouth advertising (one of the fastest growing areas of communication) but the kicker here is that companies can and should respond (to good and bad) tweets about them. And they aren’t.

Honestly, we vent on Twitter when we have a bad experience and it’s a golden and free opportunity to make things right for a customer. And the customer wants them to respond!

Based on this study by Maritz Research, only 1/3 of the people they surveyed who had tweeted a complaint received a response. 86% of those who didn’t receive a response wanted one.

As a customer, I would rather tweet at you than call customer service and get put on hold.