Tech-ed Out

So my diabetes gadgets were Out of Warranty and I had planned to keep it that way as I wait for better technology. Hope draws closer as people are actually being enrolled in the first tubeless artificial pancreas trials (wish one of the clinics were here in Cleveland!). But I’m halfway back under a warranty.

My Dexcom gave the dreaded, “transmitter battery low, reorder soon” message. So I called my medical supply company. After a slightly frustrating conversation where I had to repeat myself four times and spell the word “low” the lady said she’d get the paperwork in for me to get a new Dexcom G4 system. “Since I’m getting a whole new system, let’s put in paperwork for the Dexcom G5 please.” (Because who wants new-old technology?)

She put in the order and I anticipated full transmitter battery death was imminent and prepared to fly blind for a week or so without my CGM. Thankfully, that didn’t happen.

I got the call that I expected from the medical supply company. Continue reading

When You Think I’m On My Phone

A few years ago a relative made a comment about how much someone in the family hated it when people were on their phones at holiday gatherings. Unfortunately our world is to the point that we live through a screen, and yes it’s nice to put the phone down and engage.

When I’m Not On My Phone

But here’s my problem, people think I’m on my phone a lot when I’m actually not touching my phone. Because people aren’t observant, many people think my PDM is a phone. I was actually at a business dinner and was bolusing for my meal when an ignorant associate cracked a joke about my funky phone. I don’t share my diabetes with clients yet this guy (who was from a 3rd party vendor) would think that this clunky thing is a phone and would call attention to what I’m doing. I simply assume he’s insecure.

But the fact of the matter is that these devices I carry with me all look like phones. They’re all rectangular and have screens. I glance at my Dexcom and people think I’m glancing at a phone. When I bolus for a meal, people think I’m texting. When one of my devices beeps or buzzes people think I’m getting messages, or ask the annoying, “Who’s beeping?” question.

I keep my PDM at the table with me for meals like Thanksgiving and Christmas when I think I’ll need to take more insulin later and I don’t want to be rude and leave the table.

I’m not on my phone, I’m just doing what I need to do to not die, so just… calm down.

With that said, I’d love to be able to only have my phone at the table with me and do everything that I need to do from it. Now I can check my Dexcom from my phone, someday I’ll be able to bolus from it too.

When I Am On My Phone Continue reading

16 Things I Learned in 30 Days of Having an Electric Car

 1. It is 100% possible to forget how to pump gas. Although the Volt has a gas “generator” (not really an engine, but it’s a back up) I have yet to need to put any gas in it.

2. They’re stealthy. I had two ladies carry on a conversation behind my car while I got in, buckled up, put it in reverse and then had to stick my head out of the car and ask them to move because they couldn’t hear the car running!

3. Eavesdropping is so easy. Electric cars are silent, other drivers at intersections are not.. so you get to hear conversations people think are private.

4. There are no vibrations! You get used to it, but regular cars vibrate so much! It can’t be good for you?

5. PlugShare is awesome! As are the people on it. I used it to find a public charger when I was out at University Circle… unfortunately the chargers weren’t signed as being for EV only and a bunch of regular cars parked in the spots preventing me from charging. Continue reading

Wearable Technology: The Myth of One Size

Wearable technology isn’t really new (I’m not talking about my insulin pump either!). People have been running around with Bluetooth things in their ears appearing to talk to themselves for years now. But wearable tech took another great leap recently with things like smartwatches, fitness trackers and Google Glass.

The Pebble Smart Watch is not pebble size!

In general there are one, maybe two, sizes of each piece of wearable technology. Being married to Brad, I get to try out a a lot of fun tech and I’ve found that wearable technology is anything but one-size-fits all. More like one-size-fits-guys. Or maybe it’s just one-size-doesn’t fit me!

For my birthday, Brad got me a Fit Bit Flex and had to promptly return it and get me a Fit Bit One instead. He did his research and found online that the wristbands for the Flex model will fit “really tiny wrists.” We aren’t sure what the definition of “really tiny” is since it did not fit my wrist.  (I once had a watch sized and the jeweler sizing it had to come meet me to make sure he was sizing the watch for an adult and not a child.) The Fit Bit One fitness tracker clips onto my waistband or pocket making it a better option. Continue reading

TechnoHome

I’ve been known to talk about my high-tech life when it comes to being partially robotic (a complicated way of saying that I blog about medical devices). One perk aspect of being married to someone who is addicted to technology like Brad is that we have all sorts of cool gadgets in our home.

Most of these were given to us as gifts because…. well Brad. Some are cool little things that are not only handy, but are great conversation starters. If you’re looking for a gift for the hard-to-shop-for technology enthusiast in your life, these are some good options.

1. LED glow coasters. These are pressure sensitive and change colors the longer you have the glass on them. You can find a set of your own here. Continue reading