I Smell Insulin

“Hey, hey, wake up,” Brad whispered, gently shaking me. “Come on, wake up.”

My eyelids felt glued shut and my head was heavy with sleep. It’s gotta be 3 in the morning, why is he waking me up? I finally got one eyelid to open and pulled my face barely out of my pillow and groggily asked, “What?”

“I smell insulin and I know your blood sugar is high,” he said. “Do you need to change your pod?” I swear it took me a good 30 seconds to process this.

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Christmas Gifts for People with Diabetes

If you’ve got someone who has diabetes on your Christmas shopping list this year, listen up, this one is for you!

If you’re wondering, “What should I get for my diabetic friend/relative this year?” Allow me to help, instead ask yourself “What should I get for my diabetic friend/relative this year?”

Here’s the thing about people who live with diabetes, the disease is something they live with, I guarantee you it isn’t something that they want or view as a hobby, so it probably isn’t something you should get them gifts for. Most people with diabetes want to be seen as more than their illness, no matter how much they blog, tweet or post about it online. Look at your friend or relative as a person outside of their diabetes with their own unique personality, interests and hobbies that can provide you with plenty of ideas for gift giving.

Of course, if your loved one asks for something diabetes-related, that’s a whole different story. Sometimes they may want treated to a fancy new diabetes bag or medical alert bracelet, and if that’s the case definitely go for it!

Just don’t assume that because a person lives with a disease that they will want gifts for it.

My Phone Pouch – a Solution when You Need a Pocket

Women’s and girls clothes need pockets. Real ones, you know that you can actually put things in. Right now pockets are being touted as special features in some women’s clothing, when in fact they should be standards. Until clothing designers catch up with that need  demand we’re stuck working around the problem by sewing pockets into our dresses, making pocket garters for under dresses, or using a handy invention like MyPhonePouch.

I had the opportunity to connect with Allison, the mother behind the brilliant invention call MyPhonePouch, and learn more about her product as well as give her feedback on ways that it could be used by people with diabetes. Allison gave me my very own pouches to try out – one in each size: small, medium and large.

The Pockets Continue reading

Working Your Illness Into Your Side Hustle

This post is sponsored by Op4G, the research partner that lets you use your opinion for good. They’ve established a research community for people with diabetes to have a voice in future diabetes treatment developments, make a little extra cash and support nonprofit organizations. Sign up to be part of the community.

Nowadays ( <- wow I feel old typing that) it seems that most people don’t have just one job anymore. You’ve probably heard terms like: side hustle, gig economy, extra income, freelancing, etc. a lot more in recent years. A lot of people are taking more control over their lives and their finances through doing more things.

A lot of people, like myself, work a normal full time job and spend a good chunk of their spare time doing other things that earn money. Other people have built whole careers on these independent projects. These things range from freelance writing, editing, coding, graphic design, etc to taking surveys, mystery shopping, operating a money-making blog (not all blogs make money) or even mining Bitcoin.

People who live with chronic illnesses often have opportunities to earn money related to their conditions. Continue reading

Ways to Get Involved in Research

This post is sponsored by Op4G, the research partner that lets you use your opinion for good. They’ve established a research community for people with diabetes to have a voice in future diabetes treatment developments, make a little extra cash and support nonprofit organizations. Sign up to be part of the community.

When you live with a chronic medical condition like type 1 diabetes, it’s easy to give up on the idea of ever being cured. But science continues to progress so there’s hope. If not for a cure, then at least for better treatment.

That progression is due to research… which requires patients like us. There are a variety of ways to be involved in research for cures and treatment. Here are five that you could consider: Continue reading