Snapshots from Indy

I’ve been meaning to chronicle some of my recent travels. Today, I’m getting around to talking about my trip to Indianapolis at the end of October.

I may have been going to Indy for a Public Relations conference, but somehow the trip was significantly colored by diabetes… and not really in a bad way. I went for the PRSA International Conference as well as some of the pre-conference PRSA business.

After dinner with other PRSA chapter leaders on the first night, a lady came up to me and said, “I think you need a green one.”

I turned around to see her holding up an OmniPod PDM with a green skin. She had seen my PDM sitting on my bag and came over to say hi. Not only was the skin on hers green (my favorite color) but it also glowed in the dark, how cool is that?

As it turns out, my fellow podder and I were both diagnosed with diabetes as adults… about 5 years ago. We swapped stories and talked about not just diabetes, but just about everything else. Continue reading

Tech-ed Out

So my diabetes gadgets were Out of Warranty and I had planned to keep it that way as I wait for better technology. Hope draws closer as people are actually being enrolled in the first tubeless artificial pancreas trials (wish one of the clinics were here in Cleveland!). But I’m halfway back under a warranty.

My Dexcom gave the dreaded, “transmitter battery low, reorder soon” message. So I called my medical supply company. After a slightly frustrating conversation where I had to repeat myself four times and spell the word “low” the lady said she’d get the paperwork in for me to get a new Dexcom G4 system. “Since I’m getting a whole new system, let’s put in paperwork for the Dexcom G5 please.” (Because who wants new-old technology?)

She put in the order and I anticipated full transmitter battery death was imminent and prepared to fly blind for a week or so without my CGM. Thankfully, that didn’t happen.

I got the call that I expected from the medical supply company. Continue reading

When People Take Solace in My Illness

I feel like I’m in a perpetual state of conflict over the perception of my life with type 1 diabetes.

Because I choose to not hide my diabetes, I found myself at a party with my Dexcom sensor fully visible on my arm, talking to a friend’s husband. He was asking me the questions that I’m used to answering. The ones I get on a regular basis from family, friends, acquaintances and strangers. The questions were about what my equipment does, what I can and can’t eat, etc.

Then came the familiar one, “So as long as you do what you’re supposed to, it’s not a big deal. Right?” Continue reading

Supporting Cure Research for More than T1D

I’ve talked about why I personally participate in medical research before. As a person with type 1 diabetes, I feel that I have the obligation to do what I can do to move toward a world without T1D as well as help those who are more scientifically inclined than I am to improve quality of life and treatment options for this disease.

I support research, beyond what I’m doing personally. Which is why I got involved with CureClick, which helps studies recruit participants.

You’ll notice a new box on the sidebar of my blog (at the bottom if you’re viewing on a mobile device). You can find studies related to your medical situation and see if you qualify to participate. Most of these studies provide so
me form of compensation.

Periodically, I’ll promote different studies on my social media channels as well as here to help them find the people that they need. Here are just a few studies that are currently recruiting:

Type 2 Diabetes Management Study is seeking people who live with type 2 diabetes, ages 18-75 to participate in an online only study. Find out more here: http://curec.lk/2bRD16p

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) clinical trial is currently recruiting participants to test the effectiveness of the chemotherapy drug chlorambucil. Learn more here: http://curec.lk/2cgX8Ky

Hypertension virtual trial is recruiting people 18+ who live with hypertension for a study that requires blood pressure readings. Read more here: http://curec.lk/2c4UI4b

Migraine relief trial is recruiting people 18-75 who suffer from from frequent migraines. See if you qualify http://curec.lk/2c4UI4b

There are a variety of types of research opportunities available, some that are simply survey based, use an app, want to track your data or actually test a treatment. I’d encourage you to be as involved in relevant medical research as you feel comfortable with.

What I’m Thinking After Five Years with Type 1 Diabetes

Today is my 5th diaversary.

In May, I was invited to be part of an adults with type 1 diabetes panel at a local JDRF event. I wasn’t the youngest person on the panel, but I’d had type 1 the shortest amount of time as I was the only one diagnosed as an adult. I was asked to share about the adjustment to life with type 1 as an adult, so I gave my abbreviated diagnosis story.

I talked about the time five years ago as a recent college grad and new wife. I listed out the symptoms I was experiencing: unquenchable thirst, peeing all the time, tired, blurry vision, weight loss, vomiting… “My husband finally convinced me to go to the doctor,” I told the audience. “And they gave me a pregnancy test.” The audience had a visible physical reaction to that statement. Everyone present knew those symptoms, knew what they meant and expected me to say that when I went to the doctor they diagnosed me with diabetes right away, the pregnancy test was a surprise to them.

As I sit here in the middle of my season of 5th year milestones, I have trouble believing that five whole years have passed. And in the next minute, it’s hard to believe that only five years have passed because it feels like a life time. There’s a lot that I’m thinking about on my 5th diaversary. Continue reading