My Phone Pouch – a Solution when You Need a Pocket

Women’s and girls clothes need pockets. Real ones, you know that you can actually put things in. Right now pockets are being touted as special features in some women’s clothing, when in fact they should be standards. Until clothing designers catch up with that need  demand we’re stuck working around the problem by sewing pockets into our dresses, making pocket garters for under dresses, or using a handy invention like MyPhonePouch.

I had the opportunity to connect with Allison, the mother behind the brilliant invention call MyPhonePouch, and learn more about her product as well as give her feedback on ways that it could be used by people with diabetes. Allison gave me my very own pouches to try out – one in each size: small, medium and large.

The Pockets Continue reading

Working Your Illness Into Your Side Hustle

This post is sponsored by Op4G, the research partner that lets you use your opinion for good. They’ve established a research community for people with diabetes to have a voice in future diabetes treatment developments, make a little extra cash and support nonprofit organizations. Sign up to be part of the community.

Nowadays ( <- wow I feel old typing that) it seems that most people don’t have just one job anymore. You’ve probably heard terms like: side hustle, gig economy, extra income, freelancing, etc. a lot more in recent years. A lot of people are taking more control over their lives and their finances through doing more things.

A lot of people, like myself, work a normal full time job and spend a good chunk of their spare time doing other things that earn money. Other people have built whole careers on these independent projects. These things range from freelance writing, editing, coding, graphic design, etc to taking surveys, mystery shopping, operating a money-making blog (not all blogs make money) or even mining Bitcoin.

People who live with chronic illnesses often have opportunities to earn money related to their conditions. Continue reading

Ways to Get Involved in Research

This post is sponsored by Op4G, the research partner that lets you use your opinion for good. They’ve established a research community for people with diabetes to have a voice in future diabetes treatment developments, make a little extra cash and support nonprofit organizations. Sign up to be part of the community.

When you live with a chronic medical condition like type 1 diabetes, it’s easy to give up on the idea of ever being cured. But science continues to progress so there’s hope. If not for a cure, then at least for better treatment.

That progression is due to research… which requires patients like us. There are a variety of ways to be involved in research for cures and treatment. Here are five that you could consider: Continue reading

Incognito Diabetes

I worked at my last job for nearly 7 years. I started in July of 2011 and was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes the next month. So everyone knew that the new girl had diabetes. It was just normal and I didn’t have to think twice about things, everyone just accepted it.

On top of all of the things related to starting a new job – adjusting to a new commute, working in a new office, getting to know new colleagues and learning about a whole new industry – I had to make a few decisions about diabetes. I decided that being the new girl was enough to deal with that I wasn’t going to put it out there right away to my new coworkers.

It’s not a secret, if you Google my name, this site comes up, along with my Twitter feed and some of my work with DiabetesMine. I’m not going to great lengths to hide it, but I’m also not broadcasting it. Continue reading

A Case of Mistaken Identity: Drug Addict or PWD?

There’s a heroin epidemic in my home state. Drug addiction is a sad and serious problem in our country that is getting a lot of media attention. This crisis has had an unexpected impact on people who live with diabetes.

via Type 1 Diabetes Memes

Because after insulin, laughter can be the best medicine, those of us with diabetes make jokes about it, specifically type 1s like me who have to inject either regularly or occasionally. We joke about being high, we joke about shooting up to keep from getting high and we joke about being insulin addicts. All of which are true but out of context could sound bad.

However some of the actual realities of this disease have lead to mistaken identity in some cases.

Three things happened in the course of one week over the summer that prompted me to write this post.

Needles on the Playground Continue reading